16 9 / 2014

(vía gurl)

15 9 / 2014

orangeis:

trashybooksforladies:

Meanwhile, Larry actor Jason Biggs and George “Pornstache” Mendez actor Pablo Schrieber will not appear in Season 3.
 

image

 

image

(vía 87daysbefore)

13 9 / 2014

(Fuente: heybarto, vía gurl)

13 9 / 2014

bobdoom:

lunathepug:

What kind of noise is that supposed to be, Luna?

This is 100% worth sharing again.  It’s one of my favorite videos of all time.

(vía tyleroakley)

13 9 / 2014

polaroidtransfers:

Heat to the Rescue: Sturdy Oil Drum Survival Kit Also Converts Into Stove.

Like the Haitian earthquake of 2010, last year’s Japanese tsunami disaster spurred designers to re-think what an effective, life-saving response might look like.

Focusing on providing a source of heat, water and food housed in rollable oil drum that can be converted into a stove, Eindhoven-based Japanese designer Hikaru Imamura’s “Heat Rescue Disaster Recovery” kit reflects his belief that something as simple as heat and hot water may mean the difference between falling deathly ill or surviving.

(Fuente: treehugger.com, vía tinyhousedarling)

12 9 / 2014

dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.

On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:

"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”

Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”

Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.

The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.

Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.

Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.

Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

(vía gurl)

11 9 / 2014

tigermisu:

There’s this guy that rants everyday about how everyone is sinners at our college and someone made a bingo game to go along with him today

tigermisu:

There’s this guy that rants everyday about how everyone is sinners at our college and someone made a bingo game to go along with him today

(vía tyleroakley)

11 9 / 2014

11 9 / 2014

mumtazi:

I wish I was your favorite memory…

(vía 87daysbefore)

11 9 / 2014

September 11 2001

(Fuente: ashtoniws, vía 87daysbefore)

10 9 / 2014

nossa-mae-natureza:

Orquidea negra
black orchid

nossa-mae-natureza:

Orquidea negra

black orchid

(vía 87daysbefore)

10 9 / 2014

nosleeptilbushwick:

this is absolutely incredible

(Fuente: sizvideos, vía gurl)

09 9 / 2014

ncarinae:

marxisforbros:

Important performances in modern history.

this episode was so fucking well written and so well acted i just cant. like red’s story is so god damn real as a personal story. fuck

(Fuente: sergioxaguilera, vía andreaschoice)

09 9 / 2014

showmemakeup:

I’m quite liking these new false eyelashes I got from Primark, of all places. 
I love lashes to appear lived in, I can’t stand them fresh of the packet. 
So, I soak them in hot water with Johnson’s baby shampoo when I first get them. 
This just softens the lash hairs & takes away the rigidness. 

You’re probably thinking that this process would ruin the lashes, but I’ve always found they stay intact with no issues - both synthetic and real hair.

I usually wear my lashes for about a year or so - yes that’s correct… Over a years use out of them. 
I look after them by soaking off the glue (in the same way - hot water & baby shampoo), cleaning them, and reshaping the lashes while they dry. 

I always get asked if my lashes are my own, and this is because they look soft and fluffy - lived in. 
Everyone has their own preference when it comes to falsies; some people love the crisp look of a new set.  Whereas other people, like myself, prefer the softer appearance. 

If the lashes I’ve purchased are on a thick band and are doubled-up then I don’t soak them, I leave them as they come. 
I only do this with lashes that are on a fine band. 
Usually eyelashes made from real hair turn out much nicer than the pair I’m sporting in this image, but these are a cheap pair so they are little more wispy looking that I usually like. 
All things considered - I’m pretty impressed with the result.

showmemakeup:

I’m quite liking these new false eyelashes I got from Primark, of all places.
I love lashes to appear lived in, I can’t stand them fresh of the packet.
So, I soak them in hot water with Johnson’s baby shampoo when I first get them.
This just softens the lash hairs & takes away the rigidness.

You’re probably thinking that this process would ruin the lashes, but I’ve always found they stay intact with no issues - both synthetic and real hair.

I usually wear my lashes for about a year or so - yes that’s correct… Over a years use out of them.
I look after them by soaking off the glue (in the same way - hot water & baby shampoo), cleaning them, and reshaping the lashes while they dry.

I always get asked if my lashes are my own, and this is because they look soft and fluffy - lived in.
Everyone has their own preference when it comes to falsies; some people love the crisp look of a new set. Whereas other people, like myself, prefer the softer appearance.

If the lashes I’ve purchased are on a thick band and are doubled-up then I don’t soak them, I leave them as they come.
I only do this with lashes that are on a fine band.
Usually eyelashes made from real hair turn out much nicer than the pair I’m sporting in this image, but these are a cheap pair so they are little more wispy looking that I usually like.
All things considered - I’m pretty impressed with the result.

(vía 87daysbefore)

09 9 / 2014

lunostar:

A Victorian “poison ring” of 18k gold, with a central casket flanked by two ram’s heads (an occult symbol). The casket, which is enamelled in green and set with a large emerald, opens to reveal a sizeable inner chamber that would easily meet all your poison-storage needs.

lunostar:

A Victorian “poison ring” of 18k gold, with a central casket flanked by two ram’s heads (an occult symbol). The casket, which is enamelled in green and set with a large emerald, opens to reveal a sizeable inner chamber that would easily meet all your poison-storage needs.

(Fuente: thehairpin.com, vía 87daysbefore)